Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Book Break: Old House of Fear

While back home in Michigan over Divine Mercy weekend, I had the pleasure of browsing the Mecosta Book Gallery and coming home with my first Gothic fiction work of local literary hero and celebrated thinker and writer Russell Kirk, an unjacketed, former library edition of Old House of Fear.

Too few people, perhaps, know of Russell Kirk today. Even growing up a few miles from the tall brick house where he dwelt and wrote, and with his four daughters not far from me in age, all I knew growing up was that a eccentric writer supposedly lived in that big house. Such knowledge was wasted on my teenage self; had I known he was one of the foremost conservative political thinkers of the last century and a novelist to boot, I may have postponed Yale for a year and ultimately saved myself the trouble and the expense.

But I didn't -- and now I'm playing catchup.

I would describe Old House of Fear as a Gothic men's adventure story: equal parts ghostly yarn, murder mystery, and manful romance. Our protagonist is sent by his employer, a Scottish-American industrialist intent on buying his family's ancestral home on the remote Scottish island of Carnglass. The requisite castle has an ominous name -- the House of Fear -- though in its ancestral Gaelic it would be spelled fir or fhir and means "man." What begins as a challenging business transaction with a strange old widow becomes a treacherous tale of intimidation, terrorism, and murder, involving Communists and occultists, as well as more run-of-the-mill ruffians, a beautiful red-headed niece who may also be a witch, and the ever-present shadow of a legend: a grostesque, three-eyed goat-man said to haunt the island from time immemorial.

It is a quick and satisfactory read, if a bit tidier than I expected at the end. I enjoyed it thoroughly and recommend it wholeheartedly...if you can find it! If not, I may be convinced to loan it to you!

Monday, May 22, 2017

A New Mission


By now it’s pretty well gotten around that I’ll be leaving the role of faith formation director at the end of June. A number of you have said, “I can’t wait to hear what you’ll be doing next,” to which I reply, “Me, too!”  On the other hand, we have taken great leaps forward in the past three years, and I have never felt unappreciated or under-compensated working for the parish. It’s good work—it’s just not my work.

 I’ve made a discovery this past year: I have an evangelist’s heart.

I am competent at many things, and even skilled at some of them. I can be an administrator, a catechist, a communicator, an administrative assistant, and a laborer. I can do all sorts of things when needed. But I have an evangelist’s heart.

And, thanks be to God, I can write. I’ve known this for some time, and every staff or personal retreat I’ve been on for the past decade or more has resulted in me saying to my bride, “Whatever happens from here forward, I need to write.” I’ve been told the same thing countless times, by family and friends, acquaintances and total strangers. I’ve never made a successful go of writing on my own, however—I think primarily because, until now, I’ve tried to do it on my own. I’ve never really asked what God wanted me to write and waited for an answer.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Lost Howls of Youth



Now it seems like too much love is never enough 
You better seek out another road, 'cuz this one has ended abrupt
-- Temple of the Dog, "Say Hello 2 Heaven"

I woke this morning to a text from an old friend that Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell had died. A short while later I saw another friend had tagged me in a post on Facebook: it occurred after Soundgarden's apparently triumphant return to Detroit last night, and the early speculation is suicide. He was 52.

I don't generally go in for the extended mourning of celebrities. They are just folk, like we are: pray for their souls, and for peace and consolation for their families. Then again, sometimes a song, an image, a voice is so tied to a particular period in one's life that there is no escaping the impact. Chris Cornell's voice was the howl of my youth -- the closest thing to a rebel yell I ever sounded in my relatively serious and square teens and twenties. His bands -- especially Soundgarden and Temple of the Dog -- were a part of me in my younger days.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Book Break: Manalive

“Madness does not come by breaking out, but by giving in; by settling down in some dirty, little, self-repeating circle of ideas; by being tamed.” – G.K. Chesterton

I've quit believing in coincidence. When seemingly random events culminate in a meaningful way, providence is my line now. Such was the case when I was searching the Great River Regional Library website for an audiobook to accompany me to and from Michigan over Divine Mercy weekend. I searched for several titles by name, and several topics by keyword, to little avail. Then I stumbled across an audio version of G.K. Chesterton's Manalive, narrated by athiest-turned-Catholic and Theater of the Word founder and actor Kevin O'Brien.

I didn't know what the story was about. That it was Chesterton told me it should be good -- but as I've said before, Chesterton can be too clever by half at times, and I'd never tried his fiction before. I put in a request for this book and for Mark Twain's biography of St. Joan of Arc, and Manalive arrived first.

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Road Trip Review, Part 5: What We Learned and Why We Laughed


Emma, Trevor, and I spent a lot of time together last week -- time enough to have learned a thing or two in common and to have developed a few "in-jokes." We learned, for example, that when you're playing Score! (a road-trip game in which you count yellow cars for points*), the game gets faster and more furious as you travel south, as sunshine-colored muscle cars, Love's fuel tankers, and Penske rental trucks take over the highways. Do rental car companies in Florida stock higher numbers of brightly-hued, late-model Mustangs and Camaros? They were everywhere, and more than half were bright yellow!

We learned that, south of Tennessee, drivers have  little regard for posted speed limits, unless it's to add at least 15. In Georgia, especially Atlanta, and on the return trip through Alabama, I generally drove five or 10 miles per hour over the speed limit, even in reduced speed zones, to keep from being killed. We laughed to think that, if I got pulled over, it would be because the police figured they could actually catch up to me.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Road Trip Review, Part 4: What We Ate!

As I mentioned, one of the top priorities of the trip to Keys -- perhaps the top priority for the kids! -- was to eat good food along the way. We started right off the bat, stopping at a family favorite, Mancino's Pizza and Grinders in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, part of a smallish Midwestern chain of pizza and sandwich shops that was a go-to for Jodi and me during our Michigan years. I don't recall ever eating the pizza; the grinders are second-to-none: stacks of deli meat, cheese, and veggies on toasted, homemade Italian bread that is nothing particularly unusual and yet is unique to Mancino's somehow. I get the Italian, without fail, and am never disappointed.

Breakfasts, with just three exceptions, were complimentary hotel affairs, and as long as there's a waffle maker and coffee, how can you complain? Most of our lunches were from the cooler: ham and cheese wraps, hard-boiled eggs, fruit and nuts, granola bars, and Emma's chocolate-chip cookies.

That leaves three exceptional breakfasts, dinners, and desserts. I'll try to cover them in the order they happened, which requires me to retrace the road trip.